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New Orleans Cocktails and Classic Drinks
 

The Sazerac
America's First Cocktail

The Sazerac
The Sazerac
The Sazerac

Is it any surprise that America's first cocktail, the Sazerac, was created in New Orleans, the city that loves to party?

Back in 1838, Antoine Peychaud created the drink in a French Quarter bar and named it for his favorite French brandy, Sazerac-de-Forge et fils. In 1873, the drink was changed when American Rye whiskey was substituted for cognac, and a dash of absinthe was added by bartender Leon Lamothe, and today he is now regarded as the Father of the Sazerac. In 1912, absinthe was banned, so Peychaud substituted his special bitters in its place.

In 1893 the Grunewald Hotel was built in the city, and at this time the hotel earned the rights to Ramos Gin Fizz and the Sazerac. After changing ownership several times, the hotel was restored bringing back much of it's original grandeur and reopend in 2009 as The Roosevelt.

Today, the Sazerac is best enjoyed in many of New Orleans' finest restaurants and bars, most notably the Sazerac Bar in the The Roosevelt, where celebrities, locals, and tourists enjoy the drink.

Sazerac Recipe:

  • 1 cube sugar
  • 1 ounces (35ml) Sazerac Rye Whiskey or Buffalo Trace Bourbon
  • ounce Herbsaint
  • 3 dashes Peychaud's Bitters
  • Lemon peel

Pack an Old-Fashioned glass with ice. In a second Old-Fashioned glass place the sugar cube and add the Peychaud's Bitters to it, then crush the sugar cube. Add the Sazerac Rye Whiskey or Buffalo Trace Bourbon to the second glass containing the Peychaud's Bitters and sugar. Empty the ice from the first glass and coat the glass with the Herbsaint, then discard the remaining Herbsaint. Empty the whiskey/bitters/sugar mixture from the second glass into the first glass and garnish with lemon peel.

 
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