NEWSLETTER SIGNUP
Your monthly guide to NOLA'S foods, drinks, music and more.
Please enter a valid email address
New Orleans Restaurants & Cuisine
 

Cajun or Creole?
New Orleans Has Both, and It’s All Delicious!

Cajun and Creole food are both native to Louisiana and can be found in restaurants throughout New Orleans. Though Cajun and Creole are often used interchangeably, they actually represent distinct cuisine types derived from distinct cultures and histories. One of the simplest differences between the two cuisines is that Creole food typically uses tomatoes while traditional Cajun food does not. However, the distinction runs much deeper into the history of New Orleans.

Simply put, Cajun food is robust, country-style food, found along the bayous of Louisiana, a combination of French and Southern cuisines. It was brought to Louisiana from the French who migrated to the state from Nova Scotia 250 years ago and used simple foods, right from the land. Think of meat-heavy, one-pot dishes like jambalaya or the rice-filled pork sausage known as boudin. Though delicious Cajun food can certainly be found in New Orleans, the true heart of Cajun country lies northwest of the city in areas like Breaux Bridge and Lafayette.

Creole food is “city food,” created in New Orleans with European, African and Native American roots. The French influence is strongest, but vestiges of of Italian, Spanish, German, and even Caribbean can be found in some dishes. The essence of Creole is found in rich sauces, local herbs, red ripe tomatoes, and the prominent use of seafood, caught in local waters. It is associated with the old-line kitchens of New Orleans, where generations of traditions are carried on today. Think of rich, roux-based gumbo, shrimp creole, grits and grillades, redfish courtbouillon and more.

Both cuisines make liberal use of the "holy trinity" of cooking: chopped green peppers, onions and celery. The most common misconception is that both foods are spicy, fiery hot. Both Creole and Cajun cuisines have a depth of flavor, borne of a loving blend of local herbs and (quite often) roux and may or may not be spicy.

In New Orleans, Creole and Cajun delicacies can be found at one of our 3000 restaurants any time. It is tradition to welcome our guests with wonderful food and drink, and you’re invited!
 
Arrival
Departure
 
Hotels Bed and Breakfasts
 
Newsletter Signup

Your monthly guide to NOLA's foods, drinks, music and more

 
 

View Gallery

See More

Sign Up
close button

Get the LOCAL Perspective!

Get travel tips, find hidden gems, and get insider information from the Official New Orleans Newsletter

Email

close button

Thank You For Signing Up!

You are now subscribed to our New Orleans e-newsletter and we'll send you the news each month. You can unsubscribe at any time directly from any mailing.

Thanks again for your interest in New Orleans and best wishes for a memorable visit!

 
Things to See & Do | Travel Tools | Accommodations | Calendar | Media Relations | About NOTMC | Contact Us
Site Map | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Site Search | Meetings, Conventions & Group Sales | Doing Business in New Orleans

The Official Tourism Site of the City of New Orleans: NewOrleansOnline.com
All contents © 1996-2016 New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation unless otherwise specified herein. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED